Why Images Remain Even After Eyes Blink?

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Jan 31, 2017 12:51 PM EST

EDINBURGH, UNITED KINGDOM - JUNE 14: Jessica Harrison a BA honours student, at Edinburgh college of Art, stands beside her sculpture of eyeballs titled 'Blind Spot' influenced by a classic painting June 15, 2007 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The works of over 400 students across 23 art, design and architecture specialisms are on display throughout the college. (Photo : Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Ever wonder why the light never shuts off every time eyelids blink? Well it is because the brain is at fault. The brain takes control on every part of the body including the muscles so it can function well. That is why the eyelids are no exemption to this matter.

UC Berkeley had claimed that the eyelids automatically shutters every now and then so it can lubricate and protect the eyes. This also happens in order to roll back the eye on its socket. But why does the visual remains the same after the eyelids shuts off? Well because the brain works hard to stabilize what a person is looking at. According to the researchers of UC Berkeley, the brain repositions the alignment of the eyeballs in order to stay focus on what a person is staring. Furthermore when the eyeballs roll back to its socket, it doesn't always return to its original position. The brain sends signals to the eye muscles to reposition the misaligned vision as mention by the lead researcher, Gerrit Maus.

Neuroscience News had also reported that the eyes always need assistance by the brain so it can stay where it is supposed to be. Maus said that "Our eye muscles are quite sluggish and imprecise, so the brain needs to constantly adapt its motor signals to make sure our eyes are pointing where they're supposed to," he also added that the brain commands what a person see before and after blinking for the needed correction.

In conclusion, it shows that without the brain's help then maybe confusions may be experienced. As David Whitney (co-author) coherence happens because the brain connects the dots. It also makes a lot of prediction to balance a person's movements around the world added by Patrick Cavanagh.

To read more about this research click UC Berkeley

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